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Death and Social Networking Accounts

Death and Social Networking

Over the last few years, social media sites like MySpace, Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and many others have become a part of our everyday lives. We use theses sites to share some of the major moments in our lives with our friends and the world. But what happens to those accounts after someone dies?  Continue reading Death and Social Networking Accounts

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Pet Cremation or Burial: Putting Your Beloved Pet to Rest

Options for disposition of pets

The death of a pet can often be just as difficult a loss as any close loved one. And the choice of what to do with the remains, be it pet cremation or pet burial, is just as personal of a choice.

Continue reading Pet Cremation or Burial: Putting Your Beloved Pet to Rest

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Catholic Cremations: What to Do with the Ashes

What to do with the ashes

Catholic cremations haven’t always been such a common choice for preparing the remains of a loved one associated with the Catholic Church. Before 1963 cremations were forbidden all together in the Catholic Church, as it was held to have “pagan” practice and a denial of the doctrine of Resurrection. Continue reading Catholic Cremations: What to Do with the Ashes

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How and Where to Store an Urn

Storage of Cremation Urns

Final arrangements FAQWhen a loved one is cremated, there are many options available for honoring the life of the individual in the storage or disposition of the remains. These options can generally be distilled down to three basic choices, each of which will be discussed in its own post:

  1. Burial
  2. Scattering
  3. Storage

Click the link to view each disposition method. In today’s post, we will discuss the options for urn storage, in the home or in a columbarium. Continue reading How and Where to Store an Urn

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How to Scatter Ashes

Scattering Cremated Remains

Final arrangements FAQWhen a loved one is cremated, there are many options available for honoring the life of the individual in the storage or disposition of the remains. These options can generally be distilled down to three basic choices, each of which will be discussed in its own post:

  1. Burial
  2. Scattering
  3. Storage

Click the link to view each option. Today we will look into the process of scattering ashes or cremains. Continue reading How to Scatter Ashes

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How to Bury an Urn

Ideas for urn burial

Final arrangements FAQWhen a loved one is cremated, there are many options available for honoring the life of the individual in the storage or disposition of the remains. These options can generally be distilled down to three basic choices, each of which will be discussed in its own post:

  1. Burial
  2. Scattering
  3. Storage

Click the link to view each option. Let’s begin with the first choice listed here, burial of a cremation urn.

Continue reading How to Bury an Urn

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Help With Urns

We are here to help families.

At Urns Northwest, the joy found in a good day’s work is centered on helping our clients find what they are looking for while saving them time, money, and stress. Our customer service staff is ready to answer phone calls and/or emails with any questions you may have about our products, shipping arrangements, or personalization options.  Continue reading Help With Urns

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Memorial Service Ideas: My Special Memory of You Cards

Keepsake memory cards for funeral services

Keepsake memory cards for funeral servicesMemorial services are busy, stressful, and often a blur for the family of the deceased. Often, during a funeral service, attendees will be invited to share memories of the loved one, and these will be humorous, touching, and interesting. But how to remember so many stories and insights?

That is why at Urns Northwest we are proud to offer a ready-to-use package of memory cards, to be filled out by those who share (or don’t have time during the service to share) wonderful memories of their friend.

These packs include 50 cards and 20 pens, in a beautiful ivory pouch to store these hand-written memorials as an heirloom. Each card reads, “My Special Memory of You”, and is lined on the front and back for maximum space.

Memory Cards – “My Special Memory of You”

 

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Flying With An Urn

Flying with an urn need not be a major hassle. There are a few basic considerations and one restriction with which you must comply, and with the information provided here you should be able take the necessary steps for quick and easy airline travel.

1. Your urn must be able to pass through x-ray screening. Out of respect for the decedent, under no circumstances, even at your request, will the cremation container be opened. Thus, the container must be x-rayed. The plastic or cardboard temporary urns provided by most funeral homes will pass through screening, as will wood urns and our lovely, lightweight yet durable fabric urns.

2. Checked baggage or carry-on: check with your airline. You may transport an urn with you as a carry-on once it has passed through the screening process. Some airlines will not allow cremation urns as checked baggage, so it is best to check with the air carrier to determine the best method beforehand.

3. Other restrictions: check with your airline. While asking about checked vs. carry-on, be sure to inquire about any other restrictions your air carrier may have concerning the transportation of cremated remains.

That’s it! Here is the link to the standards for Transporting the Deceased straight from the TSA’s website.

Here are some of our most popular urns that are compatible with airline travel:

 

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Do I Have to Purchase an Urn from a Funeral Home?

Urn Storage in Mausoleum or Columbarium

The answer is a resounding No. You can purchase an urn from anywhere (online, a competing funeral home, a local artist) and bring it to the funeral home or crematorium. Legally, you may purchase a cremation urn anywhere and the funeral home cannot refuse or charge a fee to handle the urn of your choice.

According to the Federal Trade Commission’s Funeral Rule, “the funeral provider may not refuse, or charge a fee, to handle a casket [or urn] you bought elsewhere.” As they explain in the FTC’s Funerals: A Consumer Guide:

Most funeral providers are professionals who strive to serve their clients’ needs and best interests. But some aren’t. They may take advantage of their clients through inflated prices, overcharges, double charges or unnecessary services. Fortunately, there’s a federal law that makes it easier for you to choose only those goods and services you want or need and to pay only for those you select, whether you are making arrangements pre-need or at need.

 

The Funeral Rule, enforced by the Federal Trade Commission, requires funeral directors to give you itemized prices in person and, if you ask, over the phone. The Rule also requires funeral directors to give you other information about their goods and services. For example, if you ask about funeral arrangements in person, the funeral home must give you a written price list to keep that shows the goods and services the home offers. If you want to buy a casket or outer burial container, the funeral provider must show you descriptions of the available selections and the prices before actually showing you the caskets.

 

Many funeral providers offer various “packages” of commonly selected goods and services that make up a funeral. But when you arrange for a funeral, you have the right to buy individual goods and services. That is, you do not have to accept a package that may include items you do not want.

Beautiful Wood Companion Urns
One of our most popular designs, many couples purchase the “Together Again” companion urn from us and bring it in to the funeral home.

To summarize, according to the Funeral Rule:

  • You have the right to choose the funeral goods and services you want (with some exceptions).
  • The funeral provider must state this right in writing on the general price list.
  • If state or local law requires you to buy any particular item, the funeral provider must disclose it on the price list, with a reference to the specific law.
  • The funeral provider may not refuse, or charge a fee, to handle a casket you bought elsewhere.
  • A funeral provider that offers cremations must make alternative containers available.