Eulogy Examples for Everyones

Eulogy Examples for Everyone

Last Updated on October 12, 2020

Giving a eulogy for a loved one is an important and meaningful task. It’s a joy and a blessing, but can also be a bit intimidating.

So we’ve provided some samples for your inspiration, including short eulogy examples accompanying each.

Best Eulogy Examples

Skip to our favorite full-length eulogies for a….

But first, we’ll start with some short eulogy examples.

Short Eulogy Examples

Short Eulogy for a Mother

My mother, Lydia Jane Ethridge, had many passions in life. She had a passion for her children, for ensuring that we were well taken care of at all times. She had a passion for teaching art, which she did at her beloved Edwards Christian Academy in Southerfield. And she had a passion for the environment, which she instilled in my sister Valerie and I from an early age.

She was a very hard worker, and I think we can all agree that she was a talented artist. She had a deep love for her husband, Sam, whom she married in this very church on July 7th, 1993. As many of you know, Sam is no longer with us, but the years that he and Mom were able to spend together were the greatest years of her life. It gives me peace in knowing that he and Mom are finally together again.

Each of you was special to Mom in one way or another, and I want to thank you for being here today.

Short Eulogy for a Father

My Papi, Edwin James Garza, was an exceptional man. Coming from a very poor family, with just the shoes on his feet and the shirt on his back, Papi built a solid foundation for his business and for his own family. The cornerstone of this foundation was the deep-rooted pride he had in his heritage and his faith.

My Papi was usually a quiet, gentle man, but he knew how to be loud and proud when he had to be. He loved his grandchildren and instilled in them The Golden Rule: Do unto others as you would have them do unto you… the same Golden Rule he so often repeated to his own children while we were growing up. As an adult, he made the decision to leave Catholicism. However he made it clear that although he was no longer a Catholic, he was still a Christian, and would always be proud of his Catholic heritage.

When my Mama, the love of his life, passed away last year, Papi was not quite the same. My family and I find peace and solace in the fact that he is now reunited with her in heaven.

Short Eulogy for a Grandmother

My Grandma held many jobs throughout her life, from waitress to cafeteria aide. But of all the jobs she held, she perhaps took her job as “Grandma” most seriously.

I have many wonderful memories of time spent with my grandmother through the years. She was naturally a very friendly and happy person. She was always willing to give you advice if you came to her with a problem. She was instinctively a very helpful and insightful person. She was an excellent listener, and was well-versed on multiple topics. She was a very wise person and would always say, “Look forward to tomorrow, Greg, but take life one day at a time. Each day has enough worry in it.”

She loved games and puzzles, especially jigsaw puzzles. I used to watch my Grandma do her jigsaw puzzles with awe. Now as I stand before you all today, I see the bigger picture and the significance of her fitting together and connecting the pieces. It was symbolic of her ability to get through life’s challenges…with enough perseverance and dedication, you can master any challenge life throws your ways, any obstacle, any hardship. In a world that’s a box full of jumbled pieces, with a little time and effort, you too can create a picture that is fulfillment in life. Laura Lee did – she completed her puzzle and has left us with an extraordinarily beautiful picture.

Short Eulogy for a Grandfather

Thank you all for being here today as we’ve gathered to honor the life and legacy of my grandfather, Robert Alan White. To each of us here, he was either Dad, Papa, Uncle Bob, or simply Bob. No matter what we called him, he held a special place in each of our hearts that can never be replaced, but will always be remembered with great love.

Papa was born on April 16th, 1939 in the outskirts of Montgomery, Alabama, a place that he held close to his heart. He had fond childhood memories growing up in his small Southern hometown. When he would recollect these memories, which was often, he would speak of the people who made him who he was: his dad and mother, Ned and Betsy, as well as of his siblings.

He served our country in the United States Air Force for 9 years, and was married to the love of his life, Abby June (better known as Nanny) for 50 years. Papa was a good man. He was a man of few words, but you knew when he was in the room. He had an infectious laugh and a genuine smile. He loved his family deeply and wore his heart on his sleeve.

At the age of 13, Papa accepted Christ as his Lord and Savior. He shared with his family that once when he hit a dark spot in life and his faith was tested, he asked God to help him get through it. The Lord provided a way. From then on, his faith never wavered. For this wonderful reason, even though Papa has passed on from this old life, we can say without a shadow of a doubt, this isn’t so much “Goodbye” as it is, “See you soon.” And while “Twas hard to give thee up, thy will o God be done.” So before we leave, I’ll say this: we love you Papa, and we’ll see you again soon.

Short Eulogy for an Aunt

I think I had the honor of introducing myself to everyone here earlier, but just in case I missed you, I’m Annie, Faith’s niece. Aunt Faith raised me from the time I was three until I left home. She was more like mom to me than an aunt, and I’ll be forever grateful for the example of Christ’s love that she provided me during my growing up years. I wasn’t the easiest kid sometimes, but her love for me was unconditional and forgiving, just like the love of Someone else we know.

My aunt, Faith Eugenia Hamilton, was born September 4th, 1969 to my granddad and nana, John and Susie. She grew up right here in Richmond, went to high school just down the road and later to Selina’s Cosmetology School. She never married, and for this reason I would sometimes jokingly call her “Aunt Nun.” But to be honest, I was glad that it was just me and her. She was always there for me whenever I needed her, whether I had an issue with a teacher, a friend, a guy, with myself or even her. She was the most non-judgemental person I knew.

She was a prime example of what it means to show grace and forgiveness, what it means to take the narrow way without so much as a complaint. She oversaw many activities in her church and community, and continued her good works until she was no longer able to due to her cancer.

So before I close, I want to remind you all that it was her wish that you should donate to St. Jude’s in lieu of buying flowers for her grave! Or to any charity of your choice, really…it would make her happy knowing that some good is still being carried out on her behalf.


Short Eulogy for an Uncle

Good morning everyone. My name is Jerry. I’m Lonnie’s nephew. I like to say I’m Lonnie’s favorite nephew, but that’s a given really, since I’m actually his only nephew. (If you can’t already tell, I inherited my uncle’s lame sense of humor).

Leonard Roy Davis was born February 3rd, 1950, in Altus, Oklahoma. As a young man, Lonnie left high school early to join the Army. He enjoyed military life, but he also missed the simplicity of life in his hometown. When Vietnam ended and he got to go home, the first thing he did was propose to his high school sweetheart, Emily. When Emily was tragically killed in a car accident two years into their marriage, he was never the same.

Uncle Lonnie had always wanted children but knew that he would never have any of his own when Emily died. So when I came around, he was beyond excited. He would watch me, with a little help from Granny, during the evenings back when Mom worked as a nurse. My own dad was no where to be found back then, so Lonnie became sort of a father figure to me. He taught me how to hunt, how to fish, how to change a tire. How to talk to girls in a way that would get them to actually talk back to you! How to drive when I got older. Needless to say, he was the best.

If there was a cause in this world that Uncle Lonnie cherished the most, it would be the prevention of animal cruelty. So if you could find it in your heart to make a donation in his name, to the ASCPA, PETA, or your local animal shelter, I know that would have really put a smile on his face.


Short Eulogy for a Cousin

It has been the most difficult experience in the world to lose my cousin McKayla. She was so proud to be a “beach girl” through and through. Surfside was home to her, and while it isn’t the beautiful, blue-sea experience you might find elsewhere, she was proud to live here.

McKayla cared deeply about our beaches, the ocean, and the creatures that lived in and around it. She was a member of Brazosport High’s Keep It Clean club, which meets twice a month in the spring and fall to pick up litter along the coast. Kitty’s Purple Cow Cafe also held a special place in her heart…looking around I also see several of her co-workers, and I just want to say thank you. Our families were regulars there for many years when we were younger, and it was a dream of hers to one day get to work there. You made that dream come true for her.

My cousin was very outgoing and some would even say extroverted, but she was also just the sweetest girl you ever met. Her best friends since elementary school, Karissa, Alex and Gracie, are here today and can attest to this! Guys, I want you to know that you were McKayla’s world. Each of you gave her so much happiness in her young life, and in return I know that she, with each of you, built memories that will last a lifetime. I want to thank you, Karissa, Alex, and Gracie, for being here today to honor her memory. I know that this is the hardest day ever for you, but the fact that you are here would have meant the world to her.

McKayla was only 16 when God took her back to heaven. She missed her 17th birthday by just four days. It just doesn’t seem fair, does it? But who are we to question God’s will? They say that He breaks our hearts to prove to us that He only takes the best, and now I believe that with all my heart. McKayla was a beautiful, rare soul that will be forever young and beautiful, and greatly missed.


Need help writing your eulogy? We’ve written a helpful guide that will show you how, from start to finish, plus tips on how to deliver it well. If you don’t have time or are unable to write it yourself, you can reach out to Aubrey at Eulogies by Aubrey and she’ll craft a lovely eulogy using your stories and in your voice.

Full-Length Eulogy Examples

Read our full-length eulogy examples for each person below. These are typically about 1,000 words (700-1200 is ideal) and should take about five minutes to deliver.

Eulogy Example for a Mother

Good morning all.

My name is Steven Lewis and I am Lydia’s son. On behalf of myself and my sister Valerie, I want to thank you all for being here today as we formally say goodbye to our mother. I recognize most of the faces here, but there’s a few I don’t know. I would love to speak with you and shake your hand after today’s service, if you have a few moments before you leave. Each of you was special to Mom in one way or another and I want to recognize that.

My mother was born Lydia Jane Ethridge on February 25th, 1959 to my grandparents, Lucille and Edgar. She spent her childhood in Oklahoma City, where she made many lifelong friends. At the tender age of seventeen, she met my father, Hank Lewis, who was visiting the area from Kentucky. The two eloped on September 1st, 1976 and he took her home to Louisville.

Valerie and I were born just one year apart. My parents were still very young when we came around, and were struggling to get by. When our dad was laid off from his job, Mom took it upon herself to help make ends meet. She was a wonderful painter. She was able to create artwork and sell it at school functions, local fairs, and even neighborhood garage and estate sales. Mind you, the internet was not around back then for her to market her work–Mom’s paintings were good enough that word of mouth alone brought her quite a bit of opportunity.

Mom would never say this, but her work was actually compared more than once to that of famous artist Claude Monet… and maybe you knew this or not, but Mom once won a contest for best Monet impressionist.

Mom was also a big giver and often painted her birthday and Christmas gifts for friends and family. I wouldn’t be surprised if many of you here today own one or two of her original pieces!

When my parents separated in 1985, Mom decided to go back to school. She moved us to Lexington to start classes at the University of Kentucky, where she graduated in 1991 with her degree in Art History and Visual Studies. The next year she realized her lifelong dream of becoming an art teacher when she joined Edwards Christian Academy in nearby Southerfield. At Edwards, she met the man who would become the love of her life, Sam Reynolds. The two wed on July 7th, 1993 in this very church.

I see that many of you here today are teachers and students from Edwards, which sadly closed its doors for good in June of last year, about a year after Mom first started to get sick. I just want to take this time to acknowledge each of you, and to say thank you for welcoming my mother to the school like you did. She loved that school and I think her love for the kids there it was evident in the work she did. The art club that she started in 1996 went strong until the school closed its doors, starting out the first year with just 13 attendees and ending its final year with almost 100 members.

Today I also want to acknowledge my stepfather Sam. As many of you know, Sam Reynolds is no longer with us, but the years that he and Mom were able to spend together were the greatest years of her life. It gives me peace in knowing that he and Mom are finally together again.

Besides her love for painting, for Edwards, for her children and for Sam, Mom had a love for Mother Earth. It drove her mad to see litter on the side of the highway and she would often stop herself to pick it up. She stopped using plastic bags and straws long before it became trendy to do so. She had a compost garden bed and regularly participated in not only the city’s recycling program, but also her neighborhood’s Green Club. This club met once a month to make crafts out of household odds and ends that would otherwise be thrown away. Having lived an eco-friendly lifestyle for as long as we could remember, Mom instilled her passion for caring for the earth in my sister and I, and eventually in Sam, although it took him a little bit longer to adopt her ways!

That passion is actually why Mom’s remains are not here with us today. Several months before she passed, and still feeling relatively okay, Mom began to research her own final disposition. She discovered that, after death, her body could be cremated and placed in a biodegradable pod. She could be “planted” rather than buried or inurned, and her remains could provide nurture to a tree for years and years, possibly centuries, to come…. In other words, as I speak, Mom is caring for the planet in her own special way, even in death.

How wonderful is that?

Before I close, on behalf of myself and my sister, I want to share a special memory of our mother that I think does a really great job at highlighting just how wonderfully bright her heart was. From the time we were tots until probably our mid-teens, Mom thought it was fun to randomly stop whatever she was doing– painting, cooking, laundry, whatever– and yell out at the top of her lungs, “dance party!” And whatever my sister and I were doing– playing, studying, even arguing– we were obligated to stop and dance with our mom for about ten minutes, or however long Mom wanted us all to dance together! Both Valerie and I attribute this little ritual we grew up with as one of the reasons we have always been very close, and there is no else to thank for that but our wonderful mother.

So, thank you all once more for being here today as we say goodbye to our beautiful mother. A very special thank you to Angels Among Us Community Hospice, who took such good care of her in her final days. Also a big thank you to Little Bethel House of Faith for opening their doors to all of us today. Mom was not a member here but it means everything to us that we can send her off today, back to Sam, in the very place where they were united.

Thank you.


Eulogy Example for a Father

My Papi, Edwin James Garza, was an exceptional man. Coming from a very poor family, with just the shoes on his feet and the shirt on his back, Papi built a solid foundation for his business and for his own family. The cornerstone of this foundation was the deep-rooted pride he had in his heritage and his faith.

Hello everyone. My name is Katherine Hernandez and I am Edwin James Garza’s eldest daughter. On behalf of my family, my brothers Jose, Carlos, and Edwin Jr., and my sister Esme, and all of our children, I want to thank you all for being here today.

Papi was born in Los Angeles on October 2nd, 1933, and first came to San Leandro as a little boy with his family in 1940. His father and mother, Jose and Cecilia Garza, ran a Mexican grocery store and did not make very much money. To help support his parents and siblings, Papi dropped out of school at the age of sixteen and went to work for a local construction agency, T&T Dynamics. Here, he learned the value of a hard day’s work and also discovered his passion in real estate.

Together with his older brother, my Uncle Victor, Papi established Garza and Co., which he continued even after my uncle’s death in 1997. He flipped houses and also managed several rental properties up until 2005, when he officially retired and sold the last property.

Besides his family, his business was his pride and joy, and my father had a tear in his eye the day Garza & Co. closed its doors for good. His work afforded his own family a comfortable living that he was not able to enjoy growing up. My siblings and I are very grateful for that upbringing, Papi, and I hope that you knew that.

On January 1st, 1955, he met a beautiful young lady, our mother Rosalind Reynoso, at a dance hall here in San Leandro. They had a relatively quick courtship by today’s standards, and were engaged by that summer. On New Year’s Day 1956, exactly one year after they met, they wed at Holy Spirit Catholic Church. At first, the priest would not agree to marry them, since it was a holiday and also a Sunday. But after some persuasion by my father and his parents, the priest finally agreed to unite them that evening.

In the 1960s, against the wishes of their families, Mama and Papi left the Catholic Church to join a community church, Faith and Friends, which was started at a neighbor’s house down the street from where we grew up. Although his faith label changed, his faith did not. Papi always made it clear that although he was no longer a Catholic, he was still a Christian, and would always be proud of his Catholic heritage. “It’s where I first found the Lord,” he would often say.

If there is anyone here today who did not know my father personally, let me tell you a little bit about who he was as a person. My Papi was usually a quiet, gentle man, but he knew how to be loud and proud when he had to be. He loved his grandchildren and instilled in them The Golden Rule: Do unto others as you would have them do unto you… the same Golden Rule he so often repeated to his own children while we were growing up.

In his old age, and especially after Mama died, his children and his grandchildren were his pride and joy. He had a special relationship by my son Oscar. Oscar has a special love for all things skateboarding, and when he was ten years old, wanted nothing more than to visit the Braille Skateboarding warehouse here in San Leandro. Papi was able to get them tickets to an event Braille was holding that year, and Oscar got to meet Aaron Kyro and other professional skateboarders that he looked up to. Oscar will always have this special memory of getting to do that with his grandfather.

To all of the grandchildren in our family, Oscar, Christina, Alejandro, Caleb, Amy, Jaxon and Adele, Abuelo loved each of you very much. I know that it was so hard for you all to be here today to say goodbye to him, but I wanted you all to know that he was so proud of you and the amazing young people that you are.

Of course I cannot close this eulogy without any mention of the famous Mexican singer Vicente Fernandez! Papi loved him with a passion, to the point that my mother would sometimes say to him, “Why did you marry little old me and not Vicente, Edwin? You love him so much!” This would make him laugh, and then all of us kids laugh. But it was true. Papi loved everything about Vicente Fernandez. He was constantly playing his albums on our old record player, and most of the house, including the master bedroom, displayed Vicente Fernandez memorabilia. It was a joke to everyone but Papi, who took his love for Vicente quite seriously.

When my Mama, the real love of his life, passed away last year, Papi was not quite the same. He was his usual loving self, especially around the grandchildren. But this past year he had become very sad, and was not very good at hiding it. When he died in his sleep last week, my first thought was, what a blessing. I was not expecting the news, but I was not surprised, either. What a long and beautiful life he had led. What an inspiration he was to his children and grandchildren. And there was no pain for him at the end. But there is no question in my mind that he died of a broken heart. My family and I find peace and solace in the fact that he is now reunited with Mama in heaven.

I want to say a special thank-you today to Jaime Rodriguez, the funeral director here at Esperanza & Sons Funeral Home. You have shown such patience in caring for my family this past week. We are a handful, I know, but you never faltered in showing us compassion and grace when we needed it the most. I want to thank each and every one of you for being here today, as well, as we say our final goodbyes to our Papi and Abuelo. Edwin James Garza was 85 years old, he lived a long, beautiful, loved-filled life, and I want all of you to remember that as we lay him to rest today.

Thank you.


Related resource: How to Deliver a Eulogy Without Crying

Eulogy Example for a Grandmother

Hi everyone. I think I know most of you here today, but just in case, I better introduce myself. I’m Greg, Laura Lee’s oldest grandson.

We all know that these times we’re living in are a little crazy, to say the least. So before I begin, I want to take just a moment to thank you all for being here today as my family officially says goodbye to my grandmother. It means the world to me, and I know it would have meant the world to her.

My grandmother, Laura Lee Wilson (or Lee Lee, as she was sometimes called by those who knew her best), was born on March 18th, 1929. From a young age she called Frederick County, Maryland, home. In 1949 she married the love of her life, my grandfather Edward Wilson. They enjoyed a classical love story, meeting and falling in love the old-fashioned way. They courted, went steady for awhile, were engaged and finally were married. Grandma described meeting my grandfather as love at first sight. They were married for 60 long and love-filled years, until his death in 2009.

After getting married, they started their family and put down roots in Rochester, New York. They had three beautiful children together: my Uncle Jim, who passed away in ’90, my mom Alicia, and my Aunt Katie. In 1980, they moved once more, this time to Kentucky. Kentucky quickly became home to them and they immensely enjoyed the many years they spent there together.

Grandma held many jobs throughout her life. She worked in a retail store called Frank’s Sales for awhile, was a waitress for a few years, and served as a cafeteria aide for the Horse Trails School District. But of all the jobs she held, she perhaps took her job as “Grandma” most seriously.

Grandma adored her grandchildren. It was a love we could feel a mile away. All of us: myself, Alexandra, Kyle and Sam, and even the next generation of us: Lily, Macie and Kane, all knew how much we were cherished by her.

I have many wonderful memories of time spent with my grandmother through the years. We enjoyed camping trips and fishing together. No matter what we’d catch she cook it up for us to enjoy. After dinner, we’d crack up over a board game or two, or three. There was always joy to be found when you were with Grandma. There was always a board game waiting to be played, always laughter echoing through the house, and always excitement that can only come to you as a grandchild in the presence of your grandmother.

My grandma was naturally a very friendly and happy person. She was always willing to give you advice if you came to her with a problem. She was instinctively a very helpful and insightful person. She was an excellent listener, and was well-versed on multiple topics. She was a very wise person and would always say, “Look forward to tomorrow, Greg, but take life one day at a time. Each day has enough worry in it.”

Now that I’m older I realize just how sound that advice really is. If you think about it, even in the midst of all the crazy news we’re bombarded with every day, if we only take things a day at a time there really isn’t a need to get overwhelmed.

In life, my grandmother was very proud of her children and grandchildren, that we all turned out to be good people and that we all had a touch of her attributes. My grandparents lived by a fairly strict, Biblical way of life. They did not allow foul language or arguing, and they were known to implement curfews. They loved God and were sure to say their prayers at mealtimes. But they still knew how to have a good time, a life skill they passed down to their children and grandchildren.

But Grandma didn’t just talk the talk, she walked the walk, too. Throughout the years she took a helpful role in her community. She served as a volunteer at the Trails Regional Hospital for many years, and also volunteered in her retirement community. She would make soups and desserts for the elderly residents in her community.

She also enjoyed traveling. I was most intrigued to hear about her fantastic trip to Wales she took in 1995. She described it as a really great time in her life.

She was simply an amazing woman all-around. She was an excellent listener and was an encyclopedia of knowledge. She was very well-mannered and maintained an abundance of politeness, whether that meant carrying a box for someone, holding the door open for them, or just acknowledging someone by saying hello. Her good deeds for others spoke volumes. She also believed in leading by example…back in the early 80’s, for instance, she and my Grandpa took part in the Great American Smoke Out. They stopped smoking that very day and never looked back. It was little things like that that made all the difference in the lives of her children and grandchildren, whom she knew were always watching.

And if you knew Grandma, you knew that she loved games. Board games were her favorite. She enjoyed crossword puzzles too, and spent a lot of time working on her jigsaw puzzles. She was also incredibly skilled at crocheting. She would make me and my sister the absolute best homemade hats, gloves, scarves and socks. And quite possibly the warmest blankets on planet Earth.

My grandmother, Laura Lee Wilson, lived a long and fulfilled life. Towards the end of her life, she was suffering from Alzheimer’s, which robbed her and us of precious time together. She gave it her all but passed away at the age of 90, and yet somehow that just seem like near enough time. I miss her like crazy, my family misses her, and there’s no doubt everyone here does, too. And we always will. But maybe being missed like crazy is a sure sign of a life well lived…and of a life well-loved.

I used to watch my Grandma do her jigsaw puzzles with awe. Now as I stand before you all today, I see the bigger picture and the significance of her fitting together and connecting the pieces. It was symbolic of her ability to get through life’s challenges…with enough perseverance and dedication, you can master any challenge life throws your ways, any obstacle, any hardship. In a world that’s a box full of jumbled pieces, with a little time and effort, you too can create a picture that is fulfillment in life. Laura Lee did – she completed her puzzle and has left us with an extraordinarily beautiful picture.

Before I close, I want to thank you again for being here today to support my family and to honor my grandmother. I especially want to thank my mom, who went above and beyond for Grandma, especially towards the end. I love you Mom, we all love and appreciate you, and Grandma sure did as well.

And Grandma, we all love you too. Thank you for your everlasting wisdom, and for all the wonderful memories you gave us. We will do our best to pass down your generosity and kindness to the next generation, your love for all things family and friends, and your ability to always see the bigger picture.

Thank you.


Eulogy Example for a Grandfather

Hello, everyone. I know most of you here today, but for those who may not know me, my name is Kate, I’m Bob’s granddaughter. Before I begin, I want to thank you all for being here today as we’ve gathered to honor the life and legacy of my grandfather, Robert Alan White. To each of us here, he was either Dad, Papa, Uncle Bob, or simply Bob. No matter what we called him, he held a special place in each of our hearts that can never be replaced, but will always be remembered with great love.

Papa was born on April 16th, 1939 in the outskirts of Montgomery, Alabama, a place that he held close to his heart. He had fond childhood memories growing up in his small Southern hometown. When he would recollect these memories, which was often, he would speak of the people who made him who he was: his dad and mother, Ned and Betsy, as well as of his siblings. He spoke of childhood jaunts with his brother John. They would spend days together doing what boys would do, he’d say, picking tomatoes to snack on when they got hungry, that sort of thing. He spoke of time spent with his brother Silas, too, particularly of time spent together after Silas was grown. Even though Papa was ten years older, they shared a mutual love for the great outdoors and for animals, as well.

Papa loved his parents and family, and he knew that he was loved in return. His mama taught him from an early age how to read the Sunday comics, and that joy of reading stayed with him his whole life. He enjoyed reading so much so, that he would read all of his new school books within the first few weeks of the new school year. And although he was born and raised in and around Montgomery, no one in his family was surprised when he grew up and eventually settled in Texas; they always knew he’d leave home one day to visit or live in one of those interesting places he’d read about.

In 1955, at the young age of 16, Papa enlisted in the military by fibbing about his age and having his daddy sign for him. He served our country in the United States Air Force for 9 years, serving in places near and far: from Oklahoma to New York; from France to New Zealand.

Papa was married to the love of his life, Abby June, best known as Nanny, for 50 years. Papa loved Nanny more than life itself. He spent his last years taking care of her as best he could. When he was no longer able to himself, he would visit her every day that he could. He couldn’t stand leaving her when it was time to go, and often said he wished he could stay the night with her so he wouldn’t have to.

In his final year, Papa would speak of how blessed he was, how thankful he was for everything, with his only regret being that Nanny wasn’t there at home to spend it with him.

Papa was a good man. He was a man of few words, but you knew when he was in the room. He had an infectious laugh and a genuine smile. He loved his family deeply and wore his heart on his sleeve. When I think of Papa, I think of the way he said my name when I called to talk or when I came over to visit him and Nanny. Nanny would always say, “It’s Kate,” or “Kate is here, Bob.” He would immediately reply with, “You mean Katelyn Leann Smith!” When I got married, he changed it to “Katelyn Leann Smith Lewis!” He was always so happy to talk to me and I knew I was loved by him.

Me and my siblings, and all of the cousins, have wonderful memories growing up of…movies. So many movies! When we were little Nanny owned a movie store in town, and we were always the first to receive copies of the latest films, before anyone else did. This made Christmas extra fun every year.

Papa was a simple man with simple hobbies, but he was a very thoughtful and intellectual man at the same time. He enjoyed listening to and playing all kinds of music. He was very good with technology and computers, and was also into researching his family’s genealogy, a passion that he passed down to his children and grandchildren. He loved to fish, and often spoke fondly of fishing trips he would take with his neighbors. His children remember watching him race cars in Amarillo, and also going to wrestling matches together. They remember bowling outings, too, among other activities. He loved old westerns and car shows, he loved feeding the birds and squirrels, and he loved his dogs and cats.

At the age of 13, Papa accepted Christ as his Lord and Savior. He shared with his family that once when he hit a dark spot in life and his faith was tested, he asked God to help him get through it. The Lord provided a way. From then on, his faith never wavered.

For this wonderful reason, even though Papa has passed on from this old life, we can say without a shadow of a doubt, this isn’t so much “Goodbye” as it is, “See you soon.” And while “Twas hard to give thee up, thy will o God be done.” So before we leave, I’ll say this: we love you Papa, and we’ll see you again soon.

Thank you.


Eulogy Example for an Aunt

“Amazing Grace, how sweet the sound, that saved a wretch like me. I once was lost, but now am found. Was blind, but now I see.”

Amazing Grace was Aunt Faith’s absolute favorite hymn. From the time I was little, I remember her singing it in the kitchen making dinner, or humming it out in the garden. She would even belt it out opera-style while in the shower sometimes…well, she may not have wanted you all to know that part!

I think I had the honor of introducing myself to everyone here earlier, but just in case I missed you, I’m Annie, Faith’s niece. Aunt Faith raised me from the time I was three until I left home. She was more like mom to me than an aunt, and I’ll be forever grateful for the example of Christ’s love that she provided me during my growing up years. I wasn’t the easiest kid sometimes, but her love for me was unconditional and forgiving, just like the love of Someone else we know.

My aunt, Faith Eugenia Hamilton, was born September 4th, 1969 to my granddad and nana, John and Susie. She grew up right here in Richmond, went to high school just down the road and later to Selina’s Cosmetology School. From the time she was 19, she was a licensed cosmetologist, and that was something she was very proud of. I enjoyed it, too, of course! She knew how to create any hairstyle or makeup look you could dream up, which made prom, school dances, and the occasional date night for either of us super fun.

Aunt Faith never married, and for this reason I would sometimes jokingly call her “Aunt Nun.” But to be honest, I was glad that it was just me and her. She was always there for me whenever I needed her, whether I had an issue with a teacher, a friend, a guy, with myself or even her. She was the most non-judgemental person I knew…you could complain about your entire day to her and she wouldn’t berate you for it. She would listen first and then simply remind you, in a way that only she could, to see the bigger picture and to look at things from a different perspective.

Aunt Faith didn’t just say it, she lived it, too. She was a prime example of what it means to show grace and forgiveness, what it means to take the narrow way without so much as a complaint. She was an active member of her church’s women’s outreach group. Every Christmas she headed our Sunday School’s class’s (and all the other Sunday School classes’) Operation Christmas Child initiative. She sewed and donated lovies to her local children’s hospital, volunteered regularly at her local soup kitchen, and donated regularly to several children’s charities. All this on top of keeping her community beautiful from the comfort of her salon!

Because of these activities, I grew to understand on a deep level what it means to truly feel empathy and to care for those around you who are less fortunate. I’m forever grateful to her for the experiences she made sure I had.

Three years ago Aunt Faith was diagnosed with breast cancer, the same disease that took my Nana. She was in pain for much of this past year, but even as she digressed in her illness, she spent what energy she had not on herself, but on others. Up until about two months ago, you’d still find her down at the soup kitchen, handing out sandwiches, all while donning her favorite pink bandana and her face still dolled up.

My beautiful aunt passed away on December 8th, just a few weeks shy of her favorite holiday. I’m happy to say that she was still able to enjoy Christmas this year – we just celebrated a bit earlier than usual, with all the usual works. Including our annual “Happy Birthday Jesus” cake…even if she could only eat a bite or two this time.

Before I close, I want to remind you all that it was her wish that you should donate to St. Jude’s in lieu of buying flowers for her grave! Or to any charity of your choice, really…it would make her happy knowing that some good is still being carried out on her behalf.

I also want to take a moment to thank you all for being here today. I can’t tell you how grateful I am for all your messages of love and support over these past several months. All the texts, phone calls, emails, and even old memories and photos shared online, I will keep tucked away in my heart for the rest of my life.

And I want to thank you, too, Aunt Faith, for everything you have given me. You raised me as your own, taught me to be the person I am today. You taught me everything I know. I literally have no idea where I’d be in my life without you, and I hope to one day be able to pay that love forward to someone else who needs it like I did. I love you, I thank you, and I will always cherish your memory.

Thank you.


Eulogy Example for an Uncle

Proverbs 3:5 says, “Trust in the Lord with all your heart, and lean not on your own understanding.” When you’re younger, you know, you think you know what that verse means and what it stands for. It’s not until you’re hit with the reality of death that you come to realize the significance of that verse…and to feel the comfort it offers.

Good morning everyone. My name is Jerry. I’m Lonnie’s nephew. I like to say I’m Lonnie’s favorite nephew, but that’s a given really, since I’m actually his only nephew. (If you can’t already tell, I inherited my uncle’s lame sense of humor).

Truth be told, I didn’t even know myself a lot of what I’m about to share with you about Uncle Lonnie, until after he passed away last week. To me, he was just always Uncle Lonnie, who lived on the ranch, who ran Lon’s Mini Mart his whole life. Who always had and always would. I’m 35 years old and it baffles me how I never even thought to ask him about his life before I was in it. Because as close as we were, I had no idea any of this, no idea of the giant of a man he actually was in life, until my Mom and Aunt Jemmy told me I was gonna be giving the eulogy today. “Uh-oh…” I thought, “I better get to diggin’.”

So as I stand here before you now, I am so proud to share with you all some of the stories about my uncle, the man I called my best friend, but whom I apparently never really knew.

Leonard Roy Davis was born February 3rd, 1950, in Altus, Oklahoma. It wasn’t until his 12th birthday that he asked to be called “Lonnie” rather than Leonard…some kid at his class birthday party had made fun of his name. Long story short, that kid ended up with a bloody nose and Lonnie’s party was cancelled…I think the experience was a little traumatic for him and he hated the name “Leonard” ever since.

As a young man, Lonnie left high school early to join the Army. He enjoyed military life, but he also missed the simplicity of life in his hometown. When Vietnam ended and he got to go home, the first thing he did was propose to his high school sweetheart, Emily. I never had the opportunity to meet Emily because their marriage was long before I came around. But according to my mom, Emily was the one who turned Lonnie from a boy into a man. He went from rough around the edges to as gentle as a mourning dove, she said. And when Emily was tragically killed just two years into their marriage, in a car accident just down the road from the ranch, he was never the same.

Uncle Lonnie had always wanted children but knew that he would never have any of his own when Emily died. So when I came around, he was beyond excited. He would watch me, with a little help from Granny, during the evenings back when Mom worked as a nurse. My own dad was no where to be found back then, so Lonnie became sort of a father figure to me. He taught me how to hunt, how to fish, how to change a tire. How to talk to girls in a way that would get them to actually talk back to you! How to drive when I got older. Needless to say, he was the best.

When I was a teenager I became a big trouble-maker and started to hang out with the wrong crowds. When my parents couldn’t get through to me, you could bet Uncle Lonnie could. It wasn’t harsh towards me by any means. But there was something in his voice that made you shut up and listen when he was talking to you. There was something in his voice that made you want to respect him, and not just because you “had” to. I wish more than anything I could here that voice now. It was a voice of thunder but at the same time a voice of comfort, and now that’s he’s gone, if I can be honest with you, I’m feeling a little lost.

If there was a cause in this world that Uncle Lonnie cherished the most, it would be the prevention of animal cruelty. If you’ve ever been in his house, you’d see first thing walking into the den, two stuffed ducks hanging up on the wall. And you may wonder about what I just told you! Well, just believe me when I say that those two ducks were the last animals he ever hunted. There was just something about them, he’d tell me, that made him feel terrible about what he’d done to them. So even though he’d taught me how, he never hunted again, but he kept those two stuffed ducks on the wall, as a reminder I guess of his newfound convictions.

Those ducks are mine now, by the way. And I’m not about to give up hunting anytime soon. Sorry Uncle Lonnie! Not really….

All this to say, I see a lot of flowers up here in the front today. If you sent flowers for Uncle Lonnie, I’m sorry to break it to you…but he wasn’t a big flower guy! I’m just messing. But I will say, if you can find it in your heart to make a donation to your local animal shelter, the ASCPA, or even to PETA (I can’t believe I just said that), I know that would have really put a smile on his face.

Before I step down, I want to thank you all for being here today. I want to thank Mom and Aunt Jemmy for encouraging me to give the eulogy today, because I almost didn’t. And I want to thank my Uncle Lonnie for everything he was and everything he did for me. I wouldn’t be the man I am today without his example, guidance, and commitment to see me through some of the darker points in my life. Love you, Uncle Lon. And thank you. I’ll see you again one day.

Thank you.


Eulogy Example for a Cousin

Hello everyone.

My name is Denise Johnson. I’m McKayla’s cousin, for those who don’t know who I am. I want to start off by saying thank you to everyone who joined us here today to help us say good-bye to McKayla. It has been the most difficult experience in the world to lose her and I just want to express our appreciation for you being here.

McKayla Jade Brewer was born in Galveston on July 7th, 2002, right in the middle of summer. Her mom and dad, my Aunt Claudia and Uncle Mark, used to say that she brought summer with her the day she was born, because she brought so much sunshine into their lives. She was an only child, but she never once asked for a brother or sister. When she was little she would say that the fish and dolphins and sea turtles were her brothers and sisters.

McKayla grew up here in Surfside, right on the beach. Maybe to you Surfside isn’t the beautiful, blue-sea experience you might find elsewhere, but the gulf was McKayla’s home and heart and she was so proud of it. Anyone who knew McKayla knew how proud she was to be a “beach girl” through and through. Do you picture a sweet teen girl having the time of her life in the waves with her best friends on a bright, balmy day? That was McKayla. She was very outgoing and some would even say extroverted, but she was also just the sweetest girl you ever met. Her best friends since elementary school, Karissa, Alex and Gracie, are here today and can attest to this! Guys, I want you to know that you were McKayla’s world. Each of you gave her so much happiness in her young life, and in return I know that she, with each of you, built memories that will last a lifetime. I want to thank you, Karissa, Alex, and Gracie, for being here today to honor her memory. I know that this is the hardest day ever for you, but the fact that you are here would have meant the world to her.

As she grew older, McKayla took her passion for the ocean to the next level. She participated in A & M Galveston’s Sea Camp for five years in a row. There she got to experience the ocean, her home, hands-on and in a way that she never had before. Aggie Sea Camp ultimately led to her decision to one day become a marine biologist. Quite the career change from wanting to be a professional mermaid!

McKayla cared deeply about our beaches, the ocean, and the creatures that lived in and around it. She was a member of Brazosport High’s Keep It Clean club, which meets twice a month in the spring and fall to pick up litter along the coast. I see several of her Brazosport peers and teachers here today…thank you so much for being here. Just last week I was telling McKayla that I couldn’t believe that she was going to be a senior this year. And now I wish it was the only thing I couldn’t believe.

Looking around I also see several of her co-workers from Kitty’s Purple Cow Cafe. The Purple Cow held a special place in McKayla’s heart; our families were regulars there for many years when we were younger and it was a dream of hers to one day get to work there. So I want to thank you all for granting her that dream last summer and all the memories that went with it.

McKayla often expressed her desire to learn how to surf, and sadly she never got the chance to do that. But I like to think that she’s surfing the waves of heaven’s oceans right now, as I speak. If any of you surf, why don’t you catch a wave one day soon in her memory? I think that would have put a huge smile on her face.

I’m sure that everyone here today has several special memories of McKayla, and I would like to share one of mine. I am older than my beautiful cousin, but for many years our families lived right next door to each other, up until just a few years ago. One day when she was about seven, we were playing in the water and Aunt Claudia had asked me to watch McKayla while she went back to the house to get something. As soon as my aunt was gone, McKayla started screaming, “Shark! Shark! A shark just bit my hand!” I thought I was in big trouble! I ran up to her and tried to look at her hand. She was flapping it back and forth and a little crab flew up in the air and back into the water. She looked at me and I looked at her and we busted out laughing!

It’s precious memories like these that take my breath away. How could someone who was so full of life and love and joy just be taken from us like this, in the blink of an eye? McKayla was only 16 when God took her back to heaven. She missed her 17th birthday by just four days. It just doesn’t seem fair, does it? But who are we to question God’s will? They say that He breaks our hearts to prove to us that He only takes the best, and now I believe that with all my heart. McKayla was a beautiful, rare soul that will be forever young and beautiful, and greatly missed.

On behalf of my family, Aunt Claudia and Uncle Mark, her best friends forever Karissa, Alex and Gracie, and everyone who was touched by my cousin’s light, thank you for being here today. I would like to extend a special thanks as well to Martin-Deen Funeral Home for taking care of us this past week, and for helping us to get through today as gently as possible.

Lastly, I want to say thank you, my beautiful cousin McKayla, for all the love and smiles and giggles and memories that you generously gave to each and every one of us. Your life was painfully short, but the memory of you will last a lifetime.

Thank you.


Each of these samples was written by Aubrey of Eulogies by Aubrey. If you don’t have the time or simply feel overwhelmed about the eulogy, Aubrey is a terrific writer who is easy to work with.

She writes regularly for this website, and is a wonderful communicator, both in regards to communicating with you to get it just right, and with the words, tone, and phrasing of the final eulogy you’ll receive.

I highly recommend her if you need someone to write the eulogy for you, using your tone and capturing the highlights of your loved one’s life.

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1 thought on “Eulogy Examples for Everyone”

  1. Rebecca Gardner

    It was helpful when you explained that a 1,000-word eulogy will take about five minutes to give. My siblings and I are currently looking for a funeral home for my dad who passed away after a stroke last week. I want to say thanks for sharing this info I can pass along to my brother to give him some guidance for writing the eulogy.

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