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Buying Cremation Urns

Buying Cremation Urns

Quite often the problem people have buying a cremation urn is that it is their first time. They are not even sure what questions to ask, and often the answers just add to the confusion.

  • Why do I need 200 cubic inches?
  • What kind of urn can I bury?
  • Can I take this urn on a plane?
  • Will the ashes (remains) leak out?
  • How does the urn seal?

These are just a few of the questions people have about the cremation urn itself. Let’s try to demystify the process some.

1. Urn Size

Beginner's Guide to Cremation Urns

Like this urn? Click here to buy

First, the rule of thumb is that you will need a 200 cubic inch cremation urn for an adult. This is based on 1 pound per cubic inch (c.i.) – this is based on the person’s healthy weight. This is the hard part to explain, but it has to do with the person’s bone structure and not that of the flesh. Cremated remains are made up of the remaining bone fragments.

READ MORE: What size urn should I get? (Article)

Other sizes of urns are available. Keepsake urns are a type of urn that is designed to keep a small portion of the cremains only. The sizes vary on keepsake urns from a pinch to 50 c.i. or more. A child urn typically will range from 30 c.i. to 150 c.i. and again the size needed varies on the size of the child. (I really hate even discussing this and I hope this does not come across offensive.) Infant urns are usually smaller than the 50 c.i. size.

Scattering urns are used in the case that you want the urn to open fairly easily for scattering and can also be kept after as a memorial. Often we are asked to engrave the scattering urns for keeping. Again, this is a choice. You can even keep a portion of the ashes as well and seal the scattering urn.

2. Urn Material

What type of material is best for cremation urns?

Like this urn? Click here to buy

Second, the material of the urn is your choice. Wood will decay faster if buried, but that is where a burial vault plays a part of protecting the urn. Most wood urns are kept either in a niche or the home of a relative. Glass, ceramic, stone, and many other materials are also used and have their advantages or disadvantages depending on where you plan on keeping them.

3. Traveling with an Urn

Travel with a Cremation Urn

CLICK HERE for our Fabric Urns collection, designed for elegance in air travel

Third, the latest that the FAA had put out on bringing an urn on a plane is that it has to be able to be x-rayed or it must be open already. They will not open it or allow you to open one there. Now the rules may change so always check before buying an urn if you plan on taking it on a flight. Wood urns can be ran through the x-ray machine. Check the FAA website for more.

MORE INFO: Which cremation urns are suitable for air travel? (Article)

4. Sealing an Urn

Opening and Sealing a Cremation Urn

WATCH VIDEO HERE

When it comes to the cremated remains leaking out or sealing an urn, it will depend, again, on the urn you choose. First off, cremated remains are normally in a thick plastic bag. This bag can be placed into most wood urn which have screws that hold a bottom piece on.

Other cremation urns have a port that is held by screws which the cremains will have to be poured into. With wood urns you can add glue or a sealant before putting the screws in, but in most cases that isn’t necessary. Some other material urns will be similar to wood urns and others, such as a vase, will have to have the top sealed with a sealant.

READ MORE: How to open an urn (Videos with notes)

A Final Tip

Hopefully that helped clear some confusion for you about buying cremation urns. If not, feel free to write or call us with any additional questions, and continue browsing our blog articles and resources such as this one:

READ MORE: A beginner’s guide to cremation urns (Article)

 

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